ACIS Conference – digital cultural artefacts – who owns them?

An interesting project from Brett Leavy using gamification to preserve songlines in a digital cultural artefacts.

Brett tells us in this conference session that he works in a do-first, ask for forgiveness later practitioner-focussed way. He says the IP belongs essentially to the community (communities), but what about the game? If is a product – a commodity. What if a museum or archive wants to acquire and/or use the game? What about beyond Brett’s lifetime? Admittedly, the technology may not last that long, but the potential for preservation by an institution seems reasonably high.

I found this presentation and project particularly interesting because decisions about how preservation can be conceptualised and carried out can be widely different. The Monash Country Lines project is about a similar topic, but is conceptualised in a different way. Yet is also about preservation.

What both make me wonder if the digital artefacts, created from a perspective of cultural heritage and preservation, actually become the archive. The externalisation of stories presents an interesting idea about how it fits into the notion of cultural heritage within the community the stories come from. Listening to Shannon Faulkhead from Monash about the Country Lines at CIRN Conference a couple of weeks ago I got the impression that in this project the artefact is part of an ongoing archive (and narrative), not the embodiment of cultural heritage.

In the context of my own work what I am interested about is how these artefacts contribute to evidence – what are they evidence of? Whose evidence are they? One of the most interesting things about it is that they are evidence not only of indigenous stories, but also of use and knowledge of digital technologies. In the context of Brett’s game, it is evidence of the role that games play in current society in relation to learning, for access and to communicate. Brett harnesses the power of the game to present information. Is it preserving it though? What exactly is being preserved? Whose memory is it? It would be great to explore in more detail the construction of this project, as well as the Monash Country Lines project. Not to compare, but to explore how the decisions made in their inception and ongoing activities contribute to a diversity of cultural heritage and how.